Posted in flash fiction, my books

FAITH in a FLASH

Dear Readers

My first collection of flash fiction stories, FAITH in a FLASH, is currently priced just £1.99.

Faith lives. Faith breathes. Faith can be not quite what it seems.

Faith. It touches the young and the old, the rich and the poor, the sick and the healthy, those people with everything, those people with nothing. Some people are born into faith, others die devoid of faith. Some people live their lives with an abundance of faith, others barely have a pinch of faith. Some people spread their faith willingly. Some people hug their faith closely and never think to share it with anyone else. Some people’s faith flourishes. Some people’s faith is strangled by weeds.

The stories in this collection contain characters like these, as well as others. The one hundred and fifty-one flash fiction stories in this collection are split across fifteen themed chapters: Flagstones; Charity; Humility; Forgiveness; Holy Spirit; Facing Fear; Love In Adversity; Glorifying God; Joyfulness; Shadows; Darkness; Prayerfulness; Peacefulness; Hope and Soulfulness.

FAITH in a FLASH is available as an eBook by following any of these links:

Apple Books

Amazon (UK)

Amazon (USA)

Other Amazon regions are available. If you have any problem locating FAITH in a FLASH, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

If you would like to comment on this collection, or any individual stories contained within it, I would be delighted to hear from you.

To see recent reviews of FAITH in a FLASH, please click here.

Happy reading.

Kelvin

😎

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Posted in flash fiction, my books

FLASHES of WEATHER

Dear Readers

My second collection of flash fiction stories, FLASHES of WEATHER is out now, this time on the theme of weather.

I have always been fascinated by the weather, from the beginning of my engineering career in Portsmouth when I worked on two revolutionary High Frequency (HF) radar systems to the end of my engineering career in Cumbria where I was responsible for maintaining an all-singing, all-dancing weather monitoring mast which included a pair of seismic sensors that measured ground acceleration. The software I wrote for the HF radar systems got turned into a commercial system called O.S.C.R – (Ocean Surface Current Radar) which was used throughout the United Kingdom and Australia as an early warning weather system.

Rest assured, there are no science clad stories in this collection, although one or two of the characters may have a scientific bent.

Across the eighty stories in this collection I have attempted to create a diverse mix of characters, viewpoints and scenarios, capturing how weather can inspire us and torment us, and we it.

If you want to know more, maybe even download a free sample of FLASHES of WEATHER, please click one of the following links:

Amazon (UK)

Amazon (US)

Apple Books

Other Amazon regions are available. If you have any problem locating FLASHES of WEATHER, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

If you would like to comment on this collection, or any individual stories contained within it, I would be delighted to hear from you.

To read recent reviews of FLASHES of WEATHER, please click here.

Happy reading.

Kelvin

😎

Posted in flash fiction

Faith in a Flash By Kelvin M. Knight Review!

Another review of my first collection of flash fiction stories – Faith in a Flash, by Lisa on her blog. Thank you, Lisa. Thank you kindly.

culturevultureexpress

Image result for faith in a flash kelvin m knight

Faith in a Flash (2018) by Kelvin M. Knight is a great collection of short stories relating to the themes of faith and religion.

In the book, which is split into fifteen different sections, Knight looks at these topics in a very human way which was cool and fresh to see as these topics are very often dealt with in an abstract, philosophical way. So I really liked that. While I’m now part of the faithless, I grow up in a religious background so many of the characters and the rituals are familiar to me. Knight has written a collection very true to life here.

It is no easy job to pack a lot into so few words but it is done quite effortlessly here by the author. The reader gets to know the characters quite well in each piece. There is characters at various different stages of their faith…

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Posted in flash fiction, my books, reviews

FAITH in a FLASH – Recent Reviews

Review by Reverend Sheila Bridge (June 2019) – For me, Kelvin’s writing is a place where prose, poetry and faith seem to meet.


Review by Lisa over on CultureVultureExpress

Faith in a Flash (2018) by Kelvin M. Knight is a great collection of short stories relating to the themes of faith and religion.

In the book, which is split into fifteen different sections, Knight looks at these topics in a very human way which was cool and fresh to see as these topics are very often dealt with in an abstract, philosophical way. So I really liked that. While I’m now part of the faithless, I grow up in a religious background so many of the characters and the rituals are familiar to me. Knight has written a collection very true to life here.

It is no easy job to pack a lot into so few words but it is done quite effortlessly here by the author. The reader gets to know the characters quite well in each piece. There is characters at various different stages of their faith journeys but they all share one common trait: learning how to better their faith and how to better themselves as people. The latter is something any reader can relate to and strive for regardless of religious identity. The writing is simply gorgeous. It is edited to perfection and each piece paints a vivid image. This collection is a great read. It is a very truthful read that doesn’t ram religion down the reader’s throat but simply wants to tell the stories of those with faith without making readers without faith feel bad for not believing. Many preachers could take note of that. The book shows both the wonderful things about religion and also it’s flaws in a very well-crafted selection of stories.

This book is very much for everyone at any stage of the faith spectrum or outside it. Reading is about taking yourself out of your own life and looking at other peoples’ lives with an open mind and most importantly an open heart. This is a wonderful book and I’m sure you will not regret purchasing it whether you are faithful or faithless. The character portrayals are stunning and reading about both them and their faith journeys is a pure joy.


Faith in a Flash – Stories With Christian Themes – See page 15 of The Way, the Diocese of Carlisle’s Easter 2019 Newspaper


“Faith in a Flash” is a series of short, 100 word sketches / stories / meditations on what it can feel like to be a Christian in different situations of life. They are fascinating, uplifting, thought-provoking. Highly recommended. Look for it on Amazon. Price £1.99

Cumbrian Cursillo Easter Magazine.


The following review of FAITH in a FLASH is from Amazon by Ellie.TO ADD TO MY BLOG - 25-04-19.png


Here’s what more readers are saying about FAITH in a FLASH:

I do not think there is anything else like this anthology. Varied and wide-ranging stories and characters yet all drawn together by faith.

The author has poured his heart and soul into these glimpses of faith.

I love it! [Joyfulness: These Bells and Shadows: Those Bells] So very true, the two sides to the Christian faith and church goers. Both are apt and totally believable! Nicely done giving us two stories for the price of one.

If your (character’s) camera snapped a photo of your prose, it would need no airbrushing to be beautiful. [Flagstones: My Camera Never Lies]

I never tire of reading this [Hope: The Bread of Life] and recalling the randomness of its inspiration.

‘Empty of ego yet full of grace.’ and ‘Gone is flesh. Gone is bone. These lights lead the way home.’ What poetic and memorable phrases! [Flagstones: Cloistering]

I do think this story is excellent – this story in 100 words about oneness, which got me thinking that after we die we cease to be separate individuals, and we are happier when alive if we try not to be separate. [Soulfulness: A Snowflake’s Moment]

Posted in flash fiction, my books, reviews

FAITH in a FLASH – my first collection of flash fiction stories

Here are some recently published reviews for my first collection of flash fiction stories:

“Faith in a Flash” is a series of short, 100 word sketches / stories / meditations on what it can feel like to be a Christian in different situations of life. They are fascinating, uplifting, thought-provoking. Highly recommended. Look for it on Amazon. Price £1.99

Cumbrian Cursillo Easter Magazine.


FinaF The Way April 2019.jpg

From page 15 of The Way, the Diocese of Carlisle’s Easter 2019 Newspaper


Faith lives. Faith breathes. Faith can be not quite what it seems.

Faith. It touches the young and the old, the rich and the poor, the sick and the healthy, those people with everything, those people with nothing. Some people are born into faith, others die devoid of faith. Some people live their lives with an abundance of faith, others barely have a pinch of faith. Some people spread their faith willingly. Some people hug their faith closely and never think to share it with anyone else. Some people’s faith flourishes. Some people’s faith is strangled by weeds.

The stories in this collection contain characters like these, as well as others. The one hundred and fifty-one flash fiction stories in this collection are split across fifteen themed chapters: Flagstones; Charity; Humility; Forgiveness; Holy Spirit; Facing Fear; Love In Adversity; Glorifying God; Joyfulness; Shadows; Darkness; Prayerfulness; Peacefulness; Hope and Soulfulness.

FAITH in a FLASH is available as an eBook by following any of these links: Apple Books format ; Kindle format (UK) ; Kindle format (USA).

If you have any problem locating FAITH in a FLASH, please don’t hesitate to contact me.


Here’s what readers are saying:

I do not think there is anything else like this anthology. Varied and wide-ranging stories and characters yet all drawn together by faith.

The author has poured his heart and soul into these glimpses of faith.

I love it! [Joyfulness: These Bells and Shadows: Those Bells] So very true, the two sides to the Christian faith and church goers. Both are apt and totally believable! Nicely done giving us two stories for the price of one.

If your (character’s) camera snapped a photo of your prose, it would need no airbrushing to be beautiful. [Flagstones: My Camera Never Lies]

I never tire of reading this [Hope: The Bread of Life] and recalling the randomness of its inspiration.

‘Empty of ego yet full of grace.’ and ‘Gone is flesh. Gone is bone. These lights lead the way home.’ What poetic and memorable phrases! [Flagstones: Cloistering]

I do think this story is excellent – this story in 100 words about oneness, which got me thinking that after we die we cease to be separate individuals, and we are happier when alive if we try not to be separate. [Soulfulness: A Snowflake’s Moment]

Posted in flash fiction

The Shadow Symphony

pixabay image by Natan Vance

The following five hundred word story is my response to the March speculative fiction writing prompt over on Diane Wallace-Peach’s excellent blog.


THE SHADOW SYMPHONY

by

Kelvin M. Knight

She came from the emptiness of space. Darkness and silence were her eternity. She visited here out of curiosity; never had she perceived anything as unique as this planet in all the galaxies she’d drifted through.

They came from their sparkling cities. Light and noise were their bodies, generosity and hostility their lifeblood. Without one word of welcome or warning, they lashed out with their tendrils of light.

She writhed. She glistened. She consumed that light then spat globules of greyness back at them. They whirled, they dimmed, then more of them swarmed from their scintillating cities. Uncountable beings whose white faces brightened while their black eyes bulged until it seemed their heads might explode. When the deepness of their eyes touched the surface of her, she felt something explode inside them. The light they emitted as they faded was like nothing she’d ever experienced.

Sacrifice?

This concept was new to her. Watching their eyes widen, she widened herself. Seeing their eyes narrow, she narrowed herself. There was this tingling sensation reminding her of something. Something long lost yet recently found.

Them?

She expanded herself into them. She felt herself shrinking in them. Then this symphony echoed, similar to when a star died and a black hole was born. Swirling, she felt death. She felt rebirth. There was such aliveness in this moment. A moment of everything balanced by an eternity of nothing.

They kept approaching her. They kept exploding. One at a time. Thousands at a time. Such sacrifices. Such brilliant whiteness before her, waves of it like cascading nebulas.

She soaked this moment up, that shadow side of herself relishing the growth their light was giving her. She felt an uncanny warmth as her shadow stretched behind her, darkening their precious cities. And yet, her spreading shadow was not her, it was uncharacteristically distorted, disorientated, then detached. That symphony reverberated again and she felt herself detach from herself.

The last city of them surged towards her. Now their eyes were both black and white. Millions of flecks of whiteness. Millions of flecks of blackness. Stars within stars. Black holes within black holes. Universes within universes.

Separated from herself, she watched with fascination as their whiteness surrounded her. Her blackness hissed. Their whiteness sizzled. An aura of greyness appeared, then bubbled for what seemed like forever, then she was shrinking, compressing, hardening.

She was as hard as stone. She was encased in stone. Now she saw herself as they saw her. Neither coming nor going, she was a shadow of her former self. A statue. She mulled this new word over. She was a statue. One they gathered around in circles. Silent, they bowed their off-white heads.

Her black head was raised. Her eyes were open: head-sized orbs of the purest whiteness looking longingly at the cosmos.

Joining hands, they let their souls sing another symphony, one rejoicing and rejecting this victory. A symphony to help them forgive as they rekindled their world now the darkness had been halted.

(500 words)

Posted in flash fiction, my books

Sailing the Eighth Sea

Dear Readers

One of my “talking statues” – Sailing The Eighth Sea – stories has just been published in Issue 18 of The Cabinet of Heed. I would love to know what you think of it. And don’t forget the other twenty authors on display, each with their own drawer expertly polished by Simon Webster.

I wrote my first “talking statue” story in 2014 during an MA in Creative Writing at Northumbria University. They were well received on campus and at the Lit and Phil society in Newcastle at a reading night, and at a Literary Festival in Darlington I attended organised by Tracey Iceton who was doing a Phd in Creative Writing at the time. However, I didn’t do my final project on an anthology of “talking statues” opting instead on a novel.

Recently I picked my “talking statue” stories up again and have been re-enthused by the unique voices and original themes I was tackling. Back in 2014 I wrote twenty, four hundred word stories. Now I am frantically yet conscientiously putting the finishing touches to a collection of fifty to fifty-five, four hundred word “talking statue” stories each with a unique picture of the statue / sculptor telling their story.

Sailing the Eighth Sea is currently story number forty in this anthology.

I hope you enjoy my story.

Take care,

Kelvin

😎